ICCA ANNUAL REPORT 2015

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Introduction and background

As a result of the anthropogenic climate change drivers, the global mean surface temperature is projected to increase between 1.5°C and 5.8°C by 2100. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in its 4th Assessment Report, 2007 has stated that warming in Africa, throughout the continent and in all seasons, is very likely to be larger than the global annual mean warming. This warming will be greatest over the interior of semi-arid margins of the Sahara and central southern Africa. The observed annual rainfall anomalies of the climate change models indicate that there are possible increases in precipitation in East Africa, contrasted with reduced precipitation for southern Africa in the next 100 years. While for East Africa an increase in rainfall as projected would be welcome, it will be accompanied by an increase of extremely wet events, from the current 5% to about 20%, which could seriously disrupt food production systems and infrastructure. 

In contrast  to the North, most African governments have no established social security systems to cushion citizens against these climate-induced risks.

Specific impacts expected include desertification, sea level rise, reduced freshwater availability, cyclones, coastal erosion, deforestation, loss of forest quality, woodland degradation, coral bleaching, the spread of malaria and other diseases, and impacts on food security. The expected changes are expected to continue beyond the cessation of the rise of green house gases due to the long half-life of some important gases like carbon dioxide. Hence Africa needs to have strategies for adaptation and mitigation

To meet these challenges, a team of researchers from the University of Nairobi and Maseno University, sought and received funding from the Open Society Institute to establish the Climate Adaptation Research Institute (CARI) at the University of Nairobi.   Since the initiation of the project in December 2010, the name was changed to the Institute for Climate Change and Adaption (ICCA) at the University of Nairobi.

 It is envisioned that the ICCA at the University of Nairobi, will serve to offer unique trans-disciplinary programmes that will: 

  1. Build the human capacity needed to address climate change and  adaptations that meet African societies unique needs by offering University-based curricula for conventional degrees and short training courses for a wide range of professionals from all sectors of society;
  2. Encourage action-oriented research activities, including research into climate adaptation technologies, that will help to improve the climate adaptation capacity of the African peoples;
  3. Provide a framework for national and regional policy assessments and advice to governments and other public and private sector actors; and
  4. Include the grassroots and various communities within the African region in its programmes execution and implementation of research findings.

 The main objective, therefore, is to establish the Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation that will provide and/or conduct: 

  1. Formal training on climate change and adaptation at postgraduate level (Masters and Doctorate) initially, and eventually at the undergraduate level;
  2. Professional Short courses for various climate change and adaptation actors and stakeholders in the public and private sectors including NGOs;
  3. Climate change and adaptation research and knowledge exchange;
  4. Action-oriented community outreach programmes for implementation of practical climate change and adaptation options; and
  5. Policy advice on climate change and adaptation.

Programs offered in the Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation

The following academic programmes are offered at the institute:

 

·   Master of Climate Change Adaptation

·   PhD in Climate Change and Adaptation

 

 Academic staff members

The institute has since its inception in 2012 been administered by a Director and Co-ordinators of the thematic areas. Associates who are parented to various departments in the University and organizations working in the country have been giving support on the teaching function. The response from the market has been phenomenal with a total of 164 Masters and PhD students enrolled since the inception of this program. In 2015 the institute formally employed two tutorial fellows to give support in both academic and administrative duties and  on 17th December 2015 appointed more associates to give support especially on the supervision of thesis.

Below is a list of the staff  in the institute

Name

Designation

Department/Organization

Nationality

Director

Prof. Shem O Wandiga

Ag. Director

Chemistry

Kenyan

Co-ordinators

Prof. Olago Dan

Co-ordinator

Geology

Kenyan

Dr. Ouma Gilbert

Co-ordinator

Meteorology

Kenyan

Dr. Maggie Opondo

Co-ordinator

Geography

Kenyan

Dr. Dulo Simeon

Co-ordinator

Civil Engineering

Kenya

Associates

Prof. Ogara William

Associate

CIPL

Kenyan

Dr. Silas Oriaso

Associate

School of Journalism

Kenyan

Dr. Outa George

Associate

Linguistics

Kenyan

Dr. Kituyi Evans

Associate

IDRC

Kenyan

Dr. Gyampo Benjamin

Associate

AAS

Ghana

Dr. Olaka Lydia

Associate

Geology

Kenyan

Dr. Oludhe Christopher

Associate

Meteorology

Kenyan

Tutorial Fellows

Eunice Boruru

Tutorial Fellow

ICCA -

Kenyan

James Kaoga

Tutorial Fellow

 

Kenyan

 

Enrolled students in Masters and PhD programmes 2015

 

The following table gives the level of study and gender composition of the students enrolled in the courses listed above.

MASTERS IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION 2015 – 2016

S/NO

NAME

REGISTRATION No.

GENDER

  1.  

Tinashe Masimbe

I58/82065/2015

F

  1.  

Rodah Mullih

I58/80778/2015

F

  1.  

Jeddy Nthenge

I58/83062/2015

F

  1.  

Asha Shidane

I58/81261/2015

F

  1.  

Phoebe Oduor

I58/82132/2015

F

  1.  

Sharon Barasa

I58/80872/2015

F

  1.  

Njoki Gathogo

I58/81856/2015

F

  1.  

Justin Okwir

I58/829883/2015

M

  1.  

Simat Naikumi

I58/81902/2015

M

  1.  

Wentland Muhatia

I58/81731/2015

M

  1.  

Katana Baya

I58/81553/2015

M

  1.  

Benedict Kitonyi

I58/82015/2015

M

  1.  

Edward Kibanya

I58/83087/2015

M

  1.  

Ismael Lutta

I58/82647/2015

M

  1.  

Daniel Wepukhulu

I58/82924/2015

M

  1.  

Edwin Kanyongi

I58/81544/2015

M

  1.  

Nixon Moseti

I58/83048/2015

M

 

PHD IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION 2015 -16 GROUP 1

S/NO

NAME                                      

 

GENDER

  1.  

Dinah E. Ogara

I85/98048/2015

F

  1.  

Beatrice Wamalwa

185/98093/2015

F

  1.  

Lucy Mureu Iringo

185/98076/2015

F

  1.  

Peter Emoit Imatari

185/98070/2015

M

  1.  

Richard Mokua

185/98009/2015

M

  1.  

Samuel S. Ogallah

185/98029/2015

M

  1.  

Willie K. Kiplagat

185/95807/2014

M

  1.  

Jessie Owino

185/97453/2015

M

  1.  

Alemu A. Addisu

185/98392/2015

M

 

PHD IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION 2015 -16 GROUP 2

 

S/No

Name

Registration No.

Gender

  1.  

Yvonne Githiora Murimi

185/99590/2015

F

  1.  

Rennish Mboya

185/99748/2015

F

  1.  

Purity Rima Mbaabu

185/50115/2015

F

  1.  

Anne Simiyu

185/99751/2015

F

  1.  

Elish Aketch Ochungo

185/99948/2015

M

  1.  

Abdulkadir Hassan

185/50076/2015

M

  1.  

Francis Nyambariga

185/99549/2015

M

  1.  

Calvince Ouko Othoo

185/49962/2015

M

  1.  

Victor Essendi Akenga

185/99887/2015

M

  1.  

Abraham K. Biwott

185/99650/2015

M

  1.  

James Wafula

185/50105/2015

M

  1.  

Cosmas Maweu

185/99727/2015

M

  1.  

Danso Sora

185/99428/2015

M

  1.  

Joseph Owino

185/99427/2015

M

  1.  

Livingstone Bett Sambai

185/99633/2015

M

 

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT’S COMPONENT 2015

S/No

Name

Registration No

Course

Country

  1.  

Tinashe Masimbe

I58/82065/2015

F

ZIMBABWE

  1.  

Justin Okwir

I58/829883/2015

M

UGANDA

  1.  

Kim Hyung Suk

I58/74159/2014

M

KOREA

  1.  

Edgar Phiri

I58/74821/2014

M

MALAWI

  1.  

Gloriose Nsengiyumva

I58/68861/2013

 

 

  1.  

Samuel S. Ogallah

185/98029/2015

M

NIGERIA

  1.  

Alemu A. Addisu

185/98392/2015

M

ETHIOPIA

  1.  

David Mulbah jr.

I85/96247/2014 

M             

LIBERIA

  1.  

Ayodotun Bobadoye

I85/90701/2013

M

NIGERIA

 

INTERNATIONAL LINKS AND COLLABORATIONS

Currently the institute collaborates with 2 international programmes from African region namely TRECCA Africa and CIRCLE.

The institute has a collaboration with TRECCAfrica (Transdisciplinary Training for Resource Efficiency and Climate Change Adaptation in Africa) that offers doctoral and master’s training to 80 postgraduate students in Africa at six leading African Universities to provide the next generation of academics and professionals who will be able to address an interlocking set of real challenges for Africa’s future development: climate change and resource depletion.

Partner institutes in the TRECCAfrica programme are:

  • University of Nairobi (through the Institute for climate Change)
  • University of Ghana Legon
  • University of Nigeria Nssuka
  • University of Botswana
  • University of Mekelle
  • University of Dar – es - salaam Tanzania

 

The following students have benefitted from the TRECCA scholarships this year

 

S/No

Name

Degree

  1.  

Innocent Abiola

Masters in Environmental Studies (Occasional Student)

  1.  

Kofi Afakye

PhD in Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and Parasitology (Occasional Student)

  1.  

Thecla Ihuoma Akuke

PhD in Enviromnmental Planning and Management (Full Time Student)

  1.  

Alemu Abra Addisu

PhD in Climate Change and Adaptation

 

 

CLIMATE IMPACT RESEARCH CAPACITY AND LEADERSHIP ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMME FOR SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (CIRCLE):

 

The Climate Impact Research Capacity and Leadership Enhancement in Sub-Saharan Africa programme (CIRCLE) is an initiative of the Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom (UK) to develop the skills and research output of early career African researchers in the field of climate change and its local impacts on development. The programme will run from 2014 to 2018.

The three main objectives of the CIRCLE fellowship programme are:

  • To strengthen research capacity in Sub-Saharan African research institutions to support early career researchers and develop a coordinated and strategic approach to climate change research;
  • To strengthen the capacity of African researchers to undertake research on climate change and its local impacts on development;
  • To strengthen the capacity of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) to set and implement research programmes based on credible commissioning and peer-review processes.

 

The programme will offer one year Fellowships to support research proposals on the impact of climate change in Africa, with up to 100 fellowships funded over three years. Fellowships will be available for 40 post-Masters researchers and 60 post-Doctoral researchers. The fellowships will be specifically targeted at early career African researchers nominated by their home institutions in Africa and hosted by African universities and research institutions. Both home and host institutions will receive support and training to develop their institutional research capacity, with an emphasis on supporting early career researchers.

 

CIRCLE is being implemented by the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) and the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU).

As a host institution at which the nominated earlier career African researcher will be placed for a maximum period of one year to undertake his/her research. The Host Institution will have recognised expertise in climate impact research and researcher support systems that can offer learning opportunities to the selected fellows.

CIRCLE Visiting Fellow (CVF): the early career African researcher benefiting from funding under the CIRCLE Fellowship programme. An early career researcher under CIRCLE is defined as:

  • A member of staff at the Home Institution
  • Having a Masters degree or higher
  • Doctorate holders must be within 5 years of receiving their doctoral degree not having held an academic post (at lecturer/equivalent level or above) for longer than 7 years
  • Not holding a senior position within the university
  • ICCA has been selected as a Host Institution and has agreed to host five CVFs.

The following students benefited from the CIRCLE Scholarship 

S/No

Name                       

Host Institution

Area of Study

  1.  

Catherine Njeri Mugai

University of Nairobi

Post-Masters Research Fellow

  1.  

Dr. Hannah Karuri

University of Nairobi

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

  1.  

Dr. Silas  Oriaso

United Nations Environmental Programme

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

 

Publications by staff members for the year 2015

The table below gives the publications by the members of staff in the institute in the year 2015.

NO

Author

Title

Journal

Period

1

Othieno O J, Mugivane F I, Nyaga P N,and Ogara W. 2015

.” Rethink Communication Skills Content in African Veterinary Curriculum and Practice”:

A comparative review. Commonwealth Veterinary Journal. Vol. 31(2), 4-

 

2015

2

Amimo, J O., Junga J O., Ogara, W O., et al. (2015)

Detection and genetic characterization of prcine group A rotaviruse in asymptomatic pigs in smallholder farms in East Africa: predominance of P(8 genotype human assembling strains

Veterinary Microbiology volume 175, issue 2-4, year 2015, pp. 195-2010.

 

2015

3

Mbugua S.N., Wandiga S.O., Kamau G. N.

Photo Catalytic Inactivation of Escherichia coli Using Titanium(IV) Oxide-Tungsten (VI) Oxide Nanoparticles Composite. International Journal of Photocatalysis.

Photon pp.290-297.

2014

4

Anthony Joachim Rodrigues, Wandiga Shem Oyoo*, Francis O. Odundo and Enos W. Wambu

Socio-economic factors influencing the spread of drinking water diseases in rural Africa: case study of Bondo sub-county, Kenya

Journal of water and Health. 13.2, 500-509.

2015

5

Abong'o, Deborah; Wandiga,S.O.;  Jumba, Isaac; Madadi, Vincent; Wafula, Godfrey;  Van den Brink, Paul; Bbosa, Betty; Kylin, Henrik;

Occurrence, abundance and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates along River Nyando drainage basin, Kenya

African Journal of Aquatic Science. Chapter 3.p19-33. Manuscript ID: AJAS-2014-0094.R1

 

2015

6

Omemo, Peter, Olago Daniel, Ogara William, Wandiga Shem

Rapid Appraisal of Climate Change Impact on Household’s And Juvenile Diet in the Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya.

International Journal of Interdisciplinary Research and Innovations ISSN 2348-1226 (online) ISSN 2348-1218 (print)  Vol. 3, Issue 2, pp: (45-48), Month: April - June 2015, Available at: www.researchpublish.com

 

2015

7

Ikobe G.A.M., and Dulo S.O.

Assessment of Structures for Water Storage in Tanathi Water Services Board, Kenya

International Journal of Research in Engineering & Technology (IMPACT: IJRET) ISSN (E): 2321-8843; ISSN (P): 2347-4599 Vol. 3, Issue 10, Oct 2015, 13-26

2015

8

Simiyu N. L., and Dulo S.O.

Spatiotemporal Analysis of Borehole Locations in Nairobi County 1930-2013.

International Journal of Application or Innovation in Engineering & Management Volume 4, Issue 3, Pg 230-238. ISSN 2319-4847

2015

9

Olago D.O, Dulo S.O., Ouma G.O., Opondo M, Mumma A.

Country Diagnostic Report, Kenya. REACH Working Paper 3

University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. ISBN: 978-1-874370-61-1 © University of Oxford 2015. School of Geography and the Environment, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY, United Kingdom www.reachwater.org.uk

2015

10

Olago D.O., Dulo S.O, and Kanoti J.

Sustaining Urban Groundwater-Fed Water Supplies and Sanitation Systems in Africa

 

 

The Royal Society – DFID Capacity Building Initiative for Africa -Network Grant Award (AN130031) AfriWatSan publication, June 2015

2015

11

Dr. George Outa

A Preliminary [Re]-assessment of the Impact of the African Growth and Opportunities Act(AGOA) with   Policy recommendations for 2015; with Special Reference to Kenya US Trade relations”.

 

Africa Law Today. Issue 2(2014). ABA section of International law

 

2015

12

Dr. George Outa

International Consultant (IC) Nigeria 2015: End Point Millennium Development Goals Report, and; the National Human Development Report

For UNDP Nigeria

2015

13

Dr. George Outa

Consulting Editor -  Baseline Report of opportunities for the Establishment of Waste Resource Exchange between Industries in Kenya.”

Policy Briefs Expert for “Industrial Symbiosis”

 2015

 

Dr. George Outa

Media/Magazine Expert Opinion Publications

 

 

 

  • “Sugar Cane Woes-Bitter Sweet Experience of an –Cane Farmer” in Diplomat East Africa.  January 2015
  • Africa’s Quagmire in the Era of Climate Change”. Diplomat East Africa, Vol. 052 ( Nov 2014);
  •  “Right Priorities: The Obama Summit and Africa’s Future”. Diplomat East Africa. Vol. 051(Oct, 2014)
  • “Why Kenya has Stumbled in Trade Talks with Europe” Business Daily. October 20, 2014
  • “Why Our Farmers Should Abandon Sugarcane Growing”. Business Daily. Nov 24, 2014

 

 

PAPERS PRESENTED AT CONFERENCES AND OTHER ACADEMIC FORA

The following papers were presented by the indicated members of staff from the department in conferences and other academic forums in 2015

Name of staff

Paper title

Conference

Date

Wandiga, S.O, Mbugua, S.N. and Kamau, G.N.

Photo catalytic removal of  

 heavy metals, organochlorine pesticides and dyes in water using titanium(IV)-tungsten(VI) oxide nanoparticle composite

Emerging frontiers for sustainable water. A Trilateral Partnership. Africa-India-UK. Sunnyside Park Hotel, Johannesburg

3-5 August, 2015

 

Wandiga, Shem.O.

Emerging Nanotechnologies for Water Purification

NASAC-Africa Water Workshop, Hilton Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya

12-15th October, 2015

A Obandaa,b,d,, A. Cooke, E .Fèvree , S. Wang c , L.Bebora d, J. M. Mwituriaa ,R. Ngetich,W.Okotha ,C. Nafulaa, W.Ogara d ,A.G  Thaiyah d , S. Kariukia   W. A. Gebreyesb.

Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in abattoir workers and livestock from western Kenya

 

 

Presented at the 3rd International conference on Pathogens at the Human Animal Interphase (ICOPHAI) 

Chiang Mai, Thailand, August 3rd-8th, 2015

 

A Obandaa,b,d,, A. Cooke, E .Fèvree , S. Wang c , L.Bebora d, J. M. Mwituriaa ,R. Ngetich,W.Okotha ,C. Nafulaa, W.Ogara d ,A.G  Thaiyah d , S. Kariukia   W. A. Gebreyesb. 

Nasal carriage of Staphyloccocus aureus in Inpatient  Abattoir Workers and Livestock from Busia western Kenya

Presented at the 3rd International conference on Pathogens at the Human Animal Interphase (ICOPHAI) 

Chiang Mai, Thailand, August 3rd-8th, 2015

 

 

 

ICCA STUDENTS  FIELDWORK 2015

Oloitokitok MCCA Student Fieldwork

ICCA Students pose with the Pastoral Community of Oloitokitok

The second cohort of masters students attended fieldwork at Oloitokitok at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro on the Kenya side. The objective of fieldwork was to enrich the Postgraduate training through practical experience. Fieldwork is thus a key component in training at the ICCA. It gives the Post graduates an opportunity to pre-test some of the methodological tools they have learned about in class.

The fieldwork was carried out with reference to on part of an on-going ICPAC project entitled: “ Improved Agricultural Production and Food Security to Enhance Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change Through Timely Dissemination of Climate Products and Services.

The  ICCA Masters 2013/2014 attended fieldwork from the 24th of May 2015 to the 30th of May 2015. The Fieldwork will took place in two different vulnerable environments with varying levels of vulnerability and challenges. The locations were Oloitokotok Pastoral site and Oloitokitok Irrigation site.

The Objective was to carry out an assessment of the ICPAC project using various lenses (transdisciplinary, community, livelihoods, gender, food security, poverty etc).

Students were divided into two groups where they will developed tools and applied them in an assessment exercise at the above mentioned sites.

The Students also took the opportunity to give a donation to the community to support a project for the children’s nursery school.

Focus Group Discussion with the women from Oloitokitok Pastoral Site

               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICCA Student Fieldwork Kenya Forestry Services Masaita Block

 

Students and their lecturer listen keenly to Prof. Ogweno, Principal  Kenya Forestry College situated inside the Masaita Forest Block

According to the Kyoto Protocol, a carbon source is an item which releases more carbon into the atmosphere than it absorbs whereas a carbon sink absorbs more carbon from the atmosphere than it releases.  Forests have the dual purpose of providing both the function of a carbon sink during growth and a carbon source during destruction. Forests undoubtedly perform the additional service of providing invaluable services and goods to the people living around them. While forest resources are key to providing carbon sinks, and by extension mitigating climate change, measures should be put in place to ensure that the communities living around them do not suffer deprivation from lack of access to the services and products they provide.

The contribution of forests to national adaptation strategies cannot be underestimated. Afforestation and reforestation provide vital protection to the topsoil against erosion and can also be used to rehabilitate degraded land as the community work towards sustainable forest management strategies. Adaptation strategies that promote sustainable forest management and community based forest management have the potential to not only protect land and people from some of the harmful effects of rising global temperatures, but also to provide opportunities for sustainable rural development and poverty alleviation through income generation and employment opportunities.

The Institute for climate change and adaptation 3rd cohort Masters and PhD students attended fieldwork in the Londiani Forest Masaita block to assess the Plantation Establishment and Livelihood Improvement Scheme (PELIS) that has been implemented by the Kenya Forestry Services as a sustainable forestry management strategy for the communities living around the forests.

The Kenya Forestry Services has employed participatory methodologies in involving the communities in the forestry management, a strategy of working with the community to preserve the forests rather than against the community. Much as the initial indicators are that the project has been a success, this partnership between the two institutions will give an objective assessment of the PELIS project for posterity.

ICCA students in the field with the beneficiaries of the PELIS project in Masaita. The Farmers have intercropped tree seedlings with crops

 

VISITORS TO THE DEPARTMENT IN 2015

The Institue had several visitors who are interested in the progress being made in capacity building in the area of climate change. Below is a list of the visitors and where they came from.

S/No

Name

Date

From

  1.  

Esa Rantanes

11.3.15

Embassy of Finland

  1.  

Mikael Bonsdorf

11.3.15

Green Masters Middle East

  1.  

Jan Michalko

16.4.15

CIAT

  1.  

Jennifer Tangly

16.4.15

CIAT

  1.  

Prof. James K. Tuitoek

5.5.15

V.C Egerton University

  1.  

Dr. Rob Hope

8.5.15

Oxford University

  1.  

Sarah O’keef

8.5.15

Oxford University

  1.  

Dr. Alice Kaudia

9.5.15

Environment Secretary Ministry of Environment

  1.  

Boaz Waswa

25.5.15

Program Co-ordinator CIAT

  1.  

Andre Zanostra

25.5.15

Head Partnerships and Donor Relations CIAT

  1.  

Luigi Luminari

3.6.16

NDMA

  1.  

Grace Obuya

5.6. 15

World Bank

  1.  

Naomi Oates

16.6.15

ODI

  1.  

Prof Jenn- Chaun Chern

27.7.15

Department of Civil Engineering University of Taiwan

  1.  

Ms. Ruth Moraa

14.8.15

GIZ Green Economy

  1.  

Mr. Stephan Oehrlein

14.8.15

GIZ Green Economy           

  1.  

Mr. Herman Kwoba

14.8.15

GIZ Green Economy           

  1.  

Beatrice Khamati Njenga

14.9.15

African Union Commission

  1.  

Yohannes Woldetensac

14.9.15

African Union Commission

  1.  

David Clark

15.09.15

Royal Society for Chemistry

 

ICCA SEMINARS

The institute has been very successful in the area of attracting seminars from practitioners in the industry. This gives the students an insight as to the debates that are taking place in the international arena.

Below is a list of the practitioners who gave the students insights that will assist them in identifying their chosen areas of study.

 

 

 

CLIMATE CHANGE SEMINARS AT ICCA DURING 2015

S/No

Presenter

Title

Date

  1.  

Sir David King

The Road to Paris: Essential Steps to Low Carbon Economic Development.

16/2/2015

  1.  

Prof. Shem O. Wandiga

Foundation of Climate Change Science

18/3/2015

  1.  

Dr. Keith D. Shepherd

Land Health Decisions: Managing Land Health for Future Climates

25/3/2015

  1.  

Dr. George Outa

The Pleasures of Proper and Effective Academic Writing

1/ 4/2015

  1.  

Prof. Nzioki John Muthama

Forcings of climate change and Adaptation implications

8/4/2015

  1.  

Peterson Olum

Dynamism of International Climate Mitigation Regime

15/4/2015

  1.  

Joanes Atela

Implementing global climate policies in Kenya: challenges and research needs

29/4/2015

  1.  

Dr. Gilbert Ouma

Use of Local Knowledge in Climate Information Communication

6/5/2015

  1.  

Dr.  Chaudry

Conflicts and Climate Change – Mau Forest Case Study

28/5/2015

  1.  

Luigi Lumiari

Drought EWS and Disbursement of contingency funds

3/6/2015

  1.  

Amb. Stephen Gompertz

On the way to COP 21, Paris

9/6/2015

  1.  

Dr. Jenn-Chuan Chern

Typhoon Morakot Post-Disaster Social Management Systems for Reconstruction and Disaster Prevention

27/7/2015

  1.  

Prof. Shem O. Wandiga

"Enhancing the Horn of Africa Adaptive and Responsive Capacity to El Nino Impacts

10/21/2015

  1.  

Dr. Vincent Chaplot

"Mitigating and Adapting to

Climate Change through better use of our most import asset – Soil”

28/10/2015

  1.  

Prof. Agnes Muthumbi

Oceans and Climate Change

11/11/2015

  1.  

Dr. Asaah Ndambi

Livestock contribution to greenhouse gas emissions: assessment, adaptation and mitigation strategies

7/12/2015

  1.  

Mr. Frank Olok

Carbon credits and small holder farmers from the perspective of Fairtrade

12/16/2015

  1.  

Prof. Shem O. Wandiga; Prof Dan Olago; Dr Maggie Opondo; Dr. Gilbert Ouma

Transdisciplinary approaches to teaching and research methods

12/18/2015

 

2015 has also been a very active year in so far as student proposal development and submission is concerned. Below is a list of Masters and PhD students who presented their proposals to BPS for registration.

MASTERS AND PHD STUDENT PROPOSAL PRESENTATIONS 2015

S/No

Name

Level

Date

  1.  

Lillian Kwamboka Motaroki

Masters

3rd March 2015

  1.  

Monica Wangechi

Doctorate

  1.  

Brenda Monchari

Masters

18th March 2015

  1.  

Gideon Muchiri

Doctorate

 

8th April 2015

  1.  

Veronica Wangui  John

22nd April 2015

  1.  

Gloriose Nsengiyuma

Masters

20th May 2015

  1.  

Mary Mwangi

Doctorate

 

17th June 2015

  1.  

Jacinter Amadi                                   

15th July 2015

 

  1.  

Victoria Gioto

  1.  

Achola Yala                   

  1.  

Eric Wetende

Masters

  1.  

Sindani Bonzemo

Doctorate

9th September 2015

  1.  

Dorcas Kalele                

  1.  

Thomas Opande

 

  1.  

Obed Ogega                   

Masters

  1.  

Faith Saalu           

Masters

23rd September 2015

  1.  

Jesse Owino

Doctorate

30th September 2015

  1.  

Kennedy Nyongesa

Doctorate

25th November 2015

  1.  

David Mulbah jr.                               

Doctorate

2nd December 2015

  1.  

Stellamaris Muthini

  1.  

Fredrick Owino

Masters

  1.  

Sammy Oleku

 

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES 2015-2016

The following research activities are currently being undertaken by the Institute:

 

Baseline Survey for ‘Operationalising Green Economy Transition in Africa: Status of green economy initiatives in Kenya’.

 

The project is receiving financial support from the Federal Government of Germany (GIZ) with UNEP Taking the lead on the development of the Toolbox and the capacity building component and GIZ taking the lead in support for pilot application and development of a management platform. ICCA has been nominated by the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources as the national technical institution. The institute is undertaking baseline survey of the two counties (Mombasa and Nakuru) identified by the government. Lead Researcher- Prof. Shem O. Wandiga

 

Climate Land and Agro-ecosystems in East Africa (CLAREA):

 

The CLAREA team will develop post-graduate researches aiming at increasing the sustainability of local and regional agro- ecosystems in the context of current climate and socio-economic trends in East Africa. It will provide a key contribution to identify: relevant or innovative ecosystem management practices; agricultural practices; environmental policies to mitigate the impacts of climate change; and socio-economic drivers on soil quality, sustainability and resilience of agro-ecosystems, natural heritage resources, income and well being of farmers and rural communities of East Africa. Lead Researcher- Prof. Daniel  Olago

 

REACH: IMPROVING WATER SECURITY FOR THE POOR:

The University of Oxford under the leadership of Prof. Robert Hope is leading a consortium that is carrying out research related to the DFID funded programme termed "Improving Water Security for the Poor". The programme aims to: 1) increase water security for 2.5 – 5 million poor people by 2021, 2) develop and test an interdisciplinary risk-based framework, 3) establish Water Security Observatories in Africa and Asia, focusing on Fragile States, 4) provide new and replicable evidence-based metrics, tools and approaches required at operational scales, 5) generate and share new knowledge in over 60 open-access scientific papers, 6) build capacity and collaboration within the global consortium, and 7) competitively commission up to 30 per cent of the funds. The programme will run over a period of  at least 7 years and will support 88 international researchers, including 15 PhD students and 14 post-doctoral researchers, working for 220 person years to improve water security outcomes for the poor in Africa and South Asia. Lead Researcher (Kenya)-Prof. Daniel Olago

 

Knowledge Manager of the Building Resilience and Adapting to Climate Extremes and Disasters Programme (BRACED):

Development progress is threatened by extreme weather and the increasing exposure of wealth, assets and livelihoods to changing hazard contexts (IPCC 2012, GAR 2009, GFDRR 2013). Recent projections from ODI and the UK Met Office suggest that with current trends, up to 319 million extremely poor people will be living in the 45 countries most exposed to floods, droughts and heat extremes in 2030 (Shepherd et al. 2013). In Sudan and Ethiopia, two BRACED countries, the number of poor people living in areas highly exposed to climate extremes in 2030 could number nearly 40 million alone. If the international community is serious about eradicating extreme poverty by 2030, then building resilience to disasters and climate extremes has to be at the foreground of development co-operation and domestic action. Currently, the BRACED focus countries suffer a significant resilience deficit. For example, food crises in the Sahel can no longer be treated as events caused by occasional droughts or floods. Food and nutrition insecurity are long-term, chronic problems, now being exacerbated by climate change. Even in normal years, let alone extreme, the poorest households face enormous difficulty in meeting the basic food needs, due to lack of purchasing power caused by conflict and policies that favour particular groups. Perturbations in market prices or rainfall patterns can start a chain of events that appear disproportionate to the initial trigger (SWG, 2011). BRACED countries will therefore require a combination of approaches to reduce and then eliminate the resilience deficit, including but not limited to, the application of robust technologies in agriculture, watershed management, women’s empowerment, early warning systems, social protection and sustained investments to reduce the level of child malnutrition. Interventions should address systemic economic and political problems and include action to reduce price volatility, correct market failures and tackle asymmetric power relations.

 

The job of the Knowledge Manager (KM) in this context is to work cooperatively with the Fund Manager, DFID, the World Bank and the grantees of Components A, B and C to deliver tangible impacts on people’s resilience in the short term and a legacy of systemic resilience. The KM will do this by generating and applying research and evaluation knowledge about what does and does not work to build resilience, and use this to affect behaviour, shape policy and tailor practice across scales.

 

ICCA APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY

ICCA is one of the Knowledge Managers’ working with ODI to:

  • Conduct evaluations at different scale, based on a strong conceptual appreciation of resilience, blended with cross programme research that probes dimensions of gender quality, information access, governance and vulnerability at the conflict/climate interface.
  • Develop an outstanding internal and externally facing communications and dissemination hub that shares new, learning and impact from BRACED and ASP partners from the start and throughout.
  • Focus on learning and uptake based on innovative methods to turn knowledge into action, both for BRACED grantees, external stakeholders from local institution to international agencies. Leave a legacy of capacity, especially in the BRACED countries most fundamentally lacking in domestic resilience evaluation, research and knowledge sharing support.

 

Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro) Research Programme

 

 The Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro) Research Programme that is funding interdisciplinary social and natural science research to generate evidence and innovative tools to enable developing countries and their partners in sub-Saharan Africa to use groundwater in a sustainable way for the benefit of the poor. UPGro is funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), the Natural Environment Research Council.

(NERC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Improved understanding of groundwater risks and institutional responses against competing growth and development goals is central to accelerating and sustaining Africa’s development. Africa’s groundwater systems are a critical but poorly understood socio-ecological system where interactions between extractive industry growth and competing water demands for agriculture, tourism and drinking water supplies will shape poverty pathways and resource sustainability. Expansion of irrigated agriculture to increase productivity, employment and reduce poverty is a policy goal in many African countries though balancing resource sustainability and poverty reduction is an enduring challenge. This project, which in Kenya is focused in Kwale County, aims to design, test and transfer a novel, interdisciplinary and replicable Groundwater Risk Management tool to improve institutional responses to balance economic growth and human development trade-offs. The project will make three novel, interdisciplinary and replicable contributions to manage groundwater risks for growth and development in Africa:

  • Design and delivery of an automated daily time-step monitoring network for shallow groundwater levels – the first system of its kind in the world and replicable across Africa.
  • A Groundwater Risk Management tool that will be developed with stakeholders to characterise, measure and predict groundwater and poverty interactions and outcomes.
  • New frameworks and approaches to improve governance and institutional responses to reduce poverty.

Environmental sustainability

  • ICCA facilitated the planting of  100 trees in the College of Biological and Physical Sciences
  • Staff members Participated in tree planting in Upper Kabete farm

 

 

Year: 
2015:00

Message from Ag. Director


 Prof Shem O. Wandiga
Professor of Chemistry &
Ag. Director ICCA

 

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from Ag. Director>> 

 

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